Even if your take-home income is very high — we all need controls on our spending so our spending doesn’t control us.

And I want to be clear: I have NOTHING against becoming very rich, but I am much more interested that all of us (myself very much included) attend to the soul factors connected to money.

Some of us need to break out of a poverty-driven mindset, based on our history (i.e., how money was used and discussed around our original family), and because of our own poor decisions. Too many have grasped after wealth with a hungry eye, and been burned. And then, well, people give up — they imagine themselves to be poor, and seek after the elusive pot at the end of the rainbow to solve all of their problems.

Sometimes I’ve even seen this among those with seven figures on their asset statements.

I’d much rather all of us make it a point about our money to be thoughtful, industrious, *content* — and thrifty.

A big part of the battle is to rein in our grasping impulses. I wrote about this last week. But this is made even easier when we plan for what we spend — including for those things that, well … many people don’t plan for.

This might hurt a little if you don’t already have these things in your budget, but they will hurt much less when they do come up (and they inevitably will), if you’ve accounted for them.

Here we go…

Valerie McLaughlin’s


“Real World” Personal Strategy Note


Financial Independence 2: No More Surprises
“Wisdom is learning to let go when you want to hang on. Courage is learning to hang on when you want to let go.” – Mark Amend

 

This is second in a continuing series on real financial independence, and I’m here to alert you to those items in a family’s financial life that can wreck the well-planned budget…

Interest on debt
There’s no excellent reason to buy anything on credit. If you find yourself considering an expensive purchase and then trying to find the payments in your budget, you are planning for failure. The only two loans you should even consider are a home mortgage loan and a student loan for an education or training that increases your earning potential. Money makes money. Credit does the opposite. Debt breeds poverty.

The average American family carries close to $10,000 in commercial credit. At 18% interest, that’s $1,800 a year or an unnecessary $150 every month per household. If you put that payment into the markets every month over your working years, earning an average 10% return (for calculating our example here), you would retire with an additional $1.5 million.

Unknown unknowns
None of us can anticipate all our expenses. Every stage of life brings a whole new set. Perhaps extensive study and research could help you prepare. But it is easier simply to budget 10% for unknown unknowns.

Insurance deductibles
Review the insurance coverage for your car and home (if you own). A deductible and perhaps a 20% copay often apply. Out-of-pocket expenses could run several thousand dollars. It is more important to limit the maximum expense than to make sure the deductible is low. Budget for the deductible and copay expenses.

Medical costs
Medical expenses are rarely planned. To prepare your budget, have some insurance in place that will limit your catastrophic loss. Second, set up an emergency fund that will cover your expenses if they reach that limit.

Car repairs and replacement
Your car won’t last forever. It will need major repair at some point and ultimately replacement. Decide how much you are willing to spend for the lifestyle you want, and then budget for it. Don’t buy a new $30,000 car and think you won’t have any car expenses for the next five years. Even if you plan on driving your new car for the next decade, you have to start budgeting for repairs and your next new car now.

Don’t borrow to buy a car unless you can pay it off in 24 months.   Making payments for more than 24 months is nearly always a bad idea and simply ensures you won’t save, invest or grow rich. If you can’t afford to save, so that your payments are reasonable, you are stretching too much. Buy used or wait.

House repairs
Owning a home and surprise expenses are practically synonymous. The roof might leak. The plumbing could need replacing. A tree may need to be taken down before it falls. The heating or cooling system could need repairs. The carpet will need to be replaced.

So I recommend you set aside at least 1% of the value of your house for repairs, not enhancements, each year. If you have an older home, increase the minimum to at least 2% of its value.

Emergency travel
Another unexpected category is emergency travel. Family illnesses, weddings or funerals impose themselves on a family’s budget with some regularity. Sometimes even family vacations, graduations or other gatherings can strain finances. If you are both of humble means and have a large extended family, your budget could break under the strain. These are not easy decisions.

If you really get strained, I suggest you swallow some pride and ask for help with travel or accommodations. I know that family expectations can seem unreasonable, but speaking the truth in love is always a good response.

Here’s my bottom line: No budget can anticipate every major expense. Life serves up surprises with some regularity. So if we can all put some healthy margin in our daily living expenses, it will give us the stored resources to weather these major bills and then better plan for them going forward.

And, as always, my team and I are here to help! If you need someone, even just to run ideas and budgets by … we’re here for you.

Warmly,

Valerie McLaughlin
(410) 224-2600